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Каламбуры, оговорки, неологизмы и сдвиги в русской культуре XIX–XXI вв. article

Станислав Савицкий (Stanislav Savickij)

Die Welt der Slaven, Volume 67 (2022), Issue 2, Page 195 - 198

Puns, slips of the tongue, neologisms and shifts in the Russian culture of the 19th–21st centuries

This cluster of articles consists of essays written by the participants of the international interdisciplinary conference “Play of words, slips of the tongue, neologisms and shifts in the Russian culture of the 18th–20th centuries” that took place at the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences of Saint Petersburg State University on November 27–28, 2020. The conference was initiated as a dialogue of researchers who study textual and visual plays of signs where the sign reaches the limit of its functionality. It was organised by scholars from the University of Konstanz and State University of Saint Petersburg. This short introduction describes the idea and the main aspects that were discussed within the frame of the conference.

The article is written in Russian.


Панмонголизм и игра слов. К постановке проблемы смеха в творчестве Владимира Соловьева article

Станислав Савицкий (Stanislav Savickij)

Die Welt der Slaven, Volume 67 (2022), Issue 2, Page 212 - 227

Panmongolism and wordplay: An approach to the problem of laughter in Vladimir Solovʹev’s oeuvre

The article focuses on the problem of laughter in the intellectual and literary experiences of Vladimir Solovʹev. His peculiar sense of humour is represented in small talk, in his lectures, in his journalistic publications, in his literary parodies, in his lyrical poetry, and in his philosophical works. The problem of laughter as a specific component of Vladimir Solovʹev’s creative legacy was formulated by Aleksej Losev. This article is an attempt at elaborating a preliminary approach to the problem. Vladimir Solovʹev’s humour is understood here as an essential experience inextricably linked to his intellectual individuality. In particular, in this article the play of words is studied on all the levels of his philosophical and literary activities. Vladimir Solovʹev permanently made puns, intentional slips of the tongue and neologisms. Manipulations of language seemed to him a necessary element of philosophy and literature. Even in his late works on Panmongolism, he uses wordplay as a component and form of thought. By demonstrating that his philosophical statements are tightly linked to his peculiar humour, we open a possibility for further research of his works.

The article is written in Russian.


О происхождении русской философии из духа номадизма. Книга В. Эрна о Г. Сковороде и скифская мифология русского модернизма article

Станислав Савицкий (Stanislav Savickij)

Die Welt der Slaven, Volume 65 (2020), Issue 1, Page 056 - 072

The birth of Russian philosophy from the spirit of nomadism: Vladimir Ėrn’s book on Grigorij Skovoroda and the Scythian mythology of Russian Modernism

The article is an attempt at a reconstruction of the Scythian mythologies within the framework of the intellectual history of Modernism. It focuses on the works of the members of the Vjačeslav Ivanov circle. These intellectuals elaborated a new archaic anti-European program of Russian philosophy and literature, considering as its basis the 4th book of Herodotus’ “History”, devoted to the Scythians, and the myth about the Scythian philosopher Anacharsis. Vjačeslav Ivanov criticizes the values of the French Revolution (1234) in his poem “The Scythian is dancing”. The idea of spiritual nomadism, which is essential for the work of his disciple and friend Vladimir Ėrn, seems to be an echo of the intellectual experience of Vjačeslav Ivanov’s circle. In his book on Grigorij Skovoroda, Vladimir Ėrn postulates spiritual nomadism as a background of Russian philosophy. In the article the context of the formation of Scythian mythology in the community of the Neo-Slavophiles is described as well as its influence on Futurism.

The article is written in Russian.




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